What She Said: I Studied Nursing Because Of My Mother

July 14, 2021

The subject of today’s What She Said is a 22-year-old who wanted to be a lawyer but studied nursing because of her mother. She talks about being involved in her parent’s interests as a child, choosing sciences for her mother and the challenges of nursing school. 


What’s your earliest memory of childhood?

It’s memories of my sister, cousins and I playing games in the evening. Those evening games that included clapping and dancing. We’d go to our neighbour’s and ask him to give us money. We didn’t need it; it was just fun. 

Free money, nice. Did you have just one sister?

Yes. I am the last of three children. When people talk about last born privileges, I can’t relate. I did the work. Everyone did house chores and everything equally. 

The only privilege I had was being able to eat my parent’s leftover food and follow my parents everywhere. But it wasn’t special treatment. I was the one who always asked and showed interest. If my siblings showed interest, they would have taken them.

What other things were you interested in?

Books. I started writing as a teenager and used to read everything and anything. I also used to write poems. My father even gave me a collection of 17 books of Shakespeare he got from his dad. Everyone at home knows the book is mine. He was surprised when I decided to take science classes. Especially since he thought I was going to study the Arts.  

Why did you end up in science then?

My mum. She decided I was good for science classes when I was younger, and that’s how it has been since then. 

Why didn’t you tell him it was because of her? 

Because my mum was there when he asked and was giving that African mum look. 

My dad wasn’t home and wasn’t working in town then. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that I chose science class because of my mum. Then I found out I loved biology. 

Was there a reason you did? 

To be honest, the teachers. In secondary school, I had two biology teachers. They weren’t harsh like other teachers and were extremely lovely.  

The second one was beautiful. She’s the first person to make me realise or become conscious of what it means to be beautiful. I also understood her lectures. She’d explain in detail. 

So now that you were in science class, what did you want to do?

In secondary school? I was just moving along with everyone else. I was brilliant, so I knew I couldn’t fail. The only subject I didn’t do well in was further maths, and that’s because I didn’t like it enough to try. My parents didn’t bother me because I did well in other subjects.

When it was time for university, I picked pharmacy. 

Why pharmacy?

There’s this daughter of my mum’s friend that studied pharmacy. I loved the girl, so I wanted to study pharmacy. 

I’m somehow glad I didn’t. Thinking about it now, everything I did back then was because someone wanted it or did it. The only thing that was me was reading books and writing. 

So, what did you end up studying at the university?

Well, since there was no pharmacy in the school I wanted to go to, my mum said I should study nursing.  

Did you like it? 

I didn’t at first because I thought nursing was just about nurses being by the patient’s bedside and administering injections. I found out it’s more than that.

Nursing school was challenging, fun and filled with tears. Days of stressful clinical postings, writing professional exams, travelling for postings. There are a lot of fields in nursing. 

What’s your favourite thing about nursing? 

The respect accorded to you by people in other departments and outside of school.

As a nurse, do you have any advice for female patients?

Do not think any difference you notice in your body would just disappear or that it’s a part of growing up. Really get to know your body so that if you detect any changes, you can quickly seek medical attention.

Also, for women who are sexually active, you should have a pap smear every three years. 

If you couldn’t be a nurse, what’d you think you’d be?

A lawyer. I toy with the idea of actually going to study law. I’m still young.

For more stories like this, check out our #WhatSheSaid and for more women like content, click here


[shortcode]

Join The Conversation

Bring a friend.

You'll like this

Watch

Now on Zikoko

October 1, 2022

“I can’t tell you how much I miss Lagos conductors.” When Tega got into Harvard in March, she didn’t anticipate how much of her life was bout to change. Now, it’s been a week since she moved to Cambridge and she shares how it feels navigating a new city with no family or friends.

Recommended Quizzes

November 30, 2019

With No Nut November FINALLY coming to an end, we’ve decided to mark the torturous month with some more horny content. After quizzes that guessed how many people you’ve slept with, how good you are in bed and who you’ll sleep with next, this one will guess when next you’ll get lucky. Take it to […]

More from Her

September 25, 2022

Simi and Taofeeqat became best friends in SS2. Before adulthood came between them, they gave each other cheesy love letters and long hugs. In this #LettertoHER, Simi wants Taofeeqat to know she misses her.

September 20, 2022

If your partner spent so much time in your home that it felt like they lived there, moving on can be tougher. So what happens when you can’t afford to move out to move on from the memories of your partner? 7 Nigerians who’ve been heartbroken shared their experience.

What She Said: I’ll Run For Office in 2027
September 14, 2022

Nafisa Atiku-Adejuwon talks about experiencing politics in secondary school, choosing public service over a legal career and finding purpose in helping young women enter politics through “Girls Just Want to Run”.

September 11, 2022

“In everything I wanted to do, my grandma always told me to go for it, even if I wanted to fly to the moon. She never made any of my dreams seem unachievable.”

In this personal essay, Dammy talks about her grandmother, who was also her best friend. #GrandparentsDay

What She Said: Feminism Led Me to Atheism
August 31, 2022

This week’s #ZikokoWhatSheSaid subject is a 23-year-old Nigerian woman. She tells us about discovering her feminism, pansexuality and atheism through books while living with her close-knit conservative family.

Watch

Trending Videos

Zikoko Originals

September 13, 2022
Vs The World is a Zikoko original video series that follows best friends Astor and Hassan as they take on the world.
August 23, 2022
Zikoko Ships is a Zikoko Original series where we invite two people who share a relationship to play the Zikoko card games
December 14, 2020
What happens when a group of chatty young Nigerians talk about things they're passionate about? You get Nigerians talk. A show that discusses very familiar struggles for the average Nigerian. From relationship deal breakers to sex education with Nigerian parents to leaving Nigeria, be prepared for a ride.
November 2, 2020
'The Couch' is a Zikoko series featuring real life stories from anonymous people.
October 26, 2020
A collection of videos documenting some of the events of the EndSARS protests.
June 22, 2020
'The Couch' is a Zikoko series featuring real life stories from anonymous people.
June 22, 2020
Hacked is an interesting new series by Zikoko made up of fictional but hilarious chat conversations.
June 4, 2020
What happens when a group of chatty young Nigerians talk about things they're passionate about? You get Nigerians talk. A show that discusses very familiar struggles for the average Nigerian. From relationship deal breakers to sex education with Nigerian parents to leaving Nigeria, be prepared for a ride.
June 2, 2020
Quickie is a video series where everyone featured gets only one minute to rant, review or do absolutely anything.
May 14, 2020
Isolation Diary is a Zikoko series that showcases what isolation is like for one young Nigerian working from home due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Z! Stacks

Here's a rabbit hole of stories to lose yourself in:

Zikoko amplifies African youth culture by curating and creating smart and joyful content for young Africans and the world.
X